Gurugram: On Day 1 of reopening, only 3% students turn up in government schools

Gurugram: On Day 1 of reopening, only 3% students turn up in government schools


GURUGRAM: The government schools in the state, which started brief 40-minute doubt-clearing sessions for interested students of classes 9 to 12 from Monday, received a tepid response with only 3% of the students showing up. Most of the private schools are yet to roll out these classes.
In government institutions, out of 38,925 students enrolled in classes 9 to 12, only 1,119 students were present in all the government schools across the city. The class-wise data showed that 302 students of class 9, 360 students of class 10, 190 of class 11 and 267 of class 12 reported to school for the sessions or to access libraries and laboratories.
While all the schools followed the standard operating procedures like testing every teacher and sanitising students at the gate, many adopted their own set of protocols to ensure social distancing.
For instance at Jacobpura Government Senior Secondary School which is trying out the odd-even formula, only students with odd roll numbers were called on Monday to avoid crowding.
Similarly, in Sector 4/7 Government School that witnessed one of the highest student turnouts, pupils were made to enter in batches on an hourly basis. After completion of an hour, students were requested to vacate the premises to make space for the next batch.
“Forty nine students of class X and 52 of class 12 reached the school on the first day. All these 101 students were given different schedules. No student was stopped in school for more than one hour. The school has approximately 700 students enrolled in these classes,” said Suman Sharma, the school principal.
In Islampur Government Senior Secondary School, only 13 students showed up on Monday despite the arrangements made by the school. The staff claimed that turnout was low because it was the first day, and more students may be expected to come in the coming days. In many government schools like the one in Sadar, the yearly admission process was also being conducted alongside these sessions, but the school had ensured the timings of these two activities did not clash.
While government schools still managed to attract a few students, the response in the private schools that opened today was worse. In many schools like CD International, not a single student turned up for the brief sessions.
Many other private schools said they are waiting to see how the plan works in the government schools before opening. Schools like DPS, Salwan, Ryan, Suncity have claimed that their online classes are happening smoothly, and only the few students who want additional help from teachers or need to access the libraries or laboratories are showing interest. The number, however, is very discouraging, suggesting that parents are still sceptical about sending their kids to school.
For instance, at DPS in Sector 45, which will be calling students only from Tuesday and in a staggered manner, has reported that less than 5% students are showing interest in coming to school.
“The online classes are already covering the entire syllabus and students have adjusted to that system. Also, many parents are wary of sending kids to school,” said Aditi Mishra, the school principal.
At Ryan International School, students will be called to campus only from Saturday, and in the meantime, is calling 25% of the teachers each day to train them on the SOPs issued by the government.
At Salwan Public School, the brief counselling sessions will be rolled a little later as the school is one of the chosen centers for the CBSE compartment exams.
Many schools have even expressed their concerns over the move and are nervous about calling students at a time when the cases are on the rise.
“If anything happens in government schools a lot of details may not even come out. That isn’t the case for us. A single case of Covid and there’ll be witch-hunting and what not. We have all the preparations but even then we can’t ensure that campus can be entirely Covid-free. We aren’t forcing parents to send their kids as safety is more important for both kids and teachers,” said a principal of a private school who didn’t wish to be named.



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